Updates: Moving, Lenten Working, and PaganBloggers.com

With Pantheacon now over, the move is becoming much more real. If I didn’t get to see you at Pcon, I apologize, as my back was being super cranky, which made staying in the suite most of the time less stressful. It was, however, an awesome time, as usual, and I’m really glad to have been able to talk with all sorts of folks, use my possessory skills, and even do an initiation!

After resting for a couple of days, we had cleaners come and give a good clean to our kitchen and bathrooms so that the landlord can give tours. We gave notice this weekend, and there will be open houses both days this coming weekend. I do need to do some tidying and some extra packing this week, but the house is clean enough. The gardeners come tomorrow, which will sort out the yard.

Right before Pantheacon, Patheos changed their contract and people found out (or had confirmed) that the company that now runs the site supports right-wing (read: anti-pagan, anti-queer, etc) groups. While I’ve had my own reasons over the years to be disgusted with Patheos, it seems that my spidey sense has been justified.

In response, right before Pcon, my friend Jamie decided to start a pagan blogger’s website: PaganBloggers.com. I’m proud to say that I’ve been accepted as a blogger on the site, and I plan to write about radical inclusion, body positivity, and multi-faith practice. The site has an Indigogo campaign, and while it’s met the initial goal, any additional support will be most welcome! The site plans on opening March 21.

I’ve been trying to figure out what to do for a Lenten working this year. Last year’s working was rather epic, and while I’d love to do something similar again at some point, with the move I just can’t. The other problem is that pretty much all of my altar stuff is packed already. The one thing that came up the other day, though, was to write a poem a day during Lent, and since that’s pretty much sticking in my brain, I’ve decided to do it. Some will probably be posted here, but not all. The best thing is that this is portable, only requires a notebook and pen, and is low-stress. I’m kind of thinking of going to an Ash Wednesday service, I just don’t know where yet.

The wife and I are also thinking about new rituals, since we’ll be spinning up a new coven in Chicago once we’re settled. We have some really great ideas, and it’s given me a project to work on in addition to my Lenten working. Projects are good. Projects occupy the brain.

Still don’t have a place in Chicago yet, but we’ve decided to rent instead of buy for now. Wish us luck!

If you want to visit with me and/or Sarah before we leave, you need to contact me ASAP so we can make arrangements. Otherwise, we’ll have to start doing Google Hangouts!

Last Week of Lent: Social Justice Work Comes At A Cost (Paganism, Christianity, and Me)

I want to be able to say something profound here about my working, but I just can’t. At least, not in any way that’ll make sense to people other than myself. Most of what I’ve learned this week is that I shouldn’t read any social media until after I’ve done my morning prayers, had breakfast, and done my writing for the day. I’m writing about social justice, and reading other people’s social justice stuff, or about the election, before I get into my own work makes things difficult. My wife says “Social justice work comes at a cost.” and that’s quite true.

In my meditations, Jesus keeps telling me that even He had to go find solitude while do His public work. Gethsemane, the desert, and many other times He would go alone somewhere to pray. I think that’s one of the biggest lessons from Him: that quiet prayer time isn’t a bad thing to schedule into the day. Or, rather, schedule my day around the prayer time. Public work is hard, especially when you feel like you’re banging your head against the wall.

Speaking of that, one thing this week I commented on (yes, yes, I shouldn’t have bothered, but I was feeling ornery), was a post on Patheos where Gwion Raven was ranting about his identity as a pagan. Mostly about what it is, what it isn’t, and what he didn’t like about Christianity. This isn’t anything new, really, and when I challenged him on his wording, there was a “oh, well, I didn’t mean it that way” kind of response.

Gwion made it pretty clear that he wants anarchy for paganism. But here’s the thing: that’s fine for your tradition. That’s what works for you. You don’t want institutions or churches? Ok, then don’t build any. No one’s forcing you to build any or go to any. Just like no one’s forcing you to accept Christian lore or ritual in your practices.

My problem isn’t really with any of that. My problem is with the unspoken assumption that multi-faith pagans, especially those who are Christo-pagan, are somehow less than “real” pagans. I get it. I get that you don’t want to look like Christians, act like Christians, or have anything to do with Christian ritual. (Although I think that’s tough to do, given that any Gardnerian based tradition, which is the model for most witchcraft in the US and parts of Europe, has Judeo-Christian roots. I’d say that it’s a bit too late to be complaining about that. Doubly so if you’re in a Golden Dawn tradition. But I digress.) Again, that’s fine…for you.

But don’t insinuate that Christo-pagans are “fence sitters,” or delusional, or are only Christo-pagans because they don’t want to be “fully pagan.” While being neopagan and Christian is somewhat relatively new, traditions that combine magick and Christianity are not. And, really, many of those are seriously bad-ass magickal traditions in their own right. I wouldn’t want to tell a practitioner of one those traditions that they are somehow “doing it wrong.” Never mind the Euro-centrism of denying mystical Christian traditions.

Again we have a case of someone saying “All pagans should do X.” or “A proper/real pagan is…” I know the pagan community is full of humans doing stupid human tricks, but for once, I’d really be happy if people would really take a good look at and think about what they’re saying.

These lines are familiar aren’t they? Here, let me spell it out for you: “All Christians should do X.” and “A proper/real Christian is….”

Or what about: “You aren’t really bisexual, you’re either gay or your straight.”

Or: “It’s just a phase. You’ll get over it eventually.”

*sigh*

Yeah, we’ve been down this path before. Many people became pagans to run away from this type of thinking, and yet, here we are. Saying the same things that we came to paganism to avoid.

Why people don’t seem to see that they are guilty of this, no matter what progressive community they’re in (since this happens in any movement), while they loudly proclaim that they aren’t being exclusionary, boggles the mind. It’s as if the people they are railing against are the “them” and not really humans!

Oh, wait…

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